Meat Stock

serves 4

Meat stock is made by cooking pieces of near that have a joint in them for a relatively short period of time, usually between an hour and a half to three hours. It is milder in flavor and has a different amino acid profile then bone broth, with less glycine and proline. It is the go-to meal in the Intro portion of the diet. This recipe is courtesy of the brilliant GAPS chef, Monica Corrado

2-3 Pounds pastured turkey or chicken thighs or quarters, skin on (or 1 whole pastured chicken, cut up)

3-4 carrots, coarsely chopped

1 small onion

3-4 celery ribs, chopped

Handful of black peppercorns 

1-2 teaspoons sea salt

2-3 sprigs fresh rosemary or thyme

2-4 tablespoons tomato paste (optional)

2-4 garlic cloves, to finish

 

Place all ingredients except garlic in a 5- to 6- quart Dutch oven. Cover with water, to 2 inches above the ingredients. Place in a 350 degree F oven for 3 hours or in a Crock-Pot on low for 6 to 8 hours. Serve the meat and vegetables with a cup of stock alongside. Use a garlic press to add a small clove of garlic to each cup of stock, along with some good sea salt, whey, or probiotic juice.

 

Homemade Chicken Broth

Makes about 4 quarts

Chicken broth is just what the doctor ordered on a cold day, when you're suffering with an cute illness, or as the base of any number of soups, stews and casseroles. You can't go wrong with the mild, nourishing flavor of chicken broth!

 

1  3- to 4- pound stewing hen, 1-2 chicken carcasses, or 3-4 pounds chicken necks, backs, and wings

4 quarts filtered water

2-4 chicken feet (optional)

1-2 chicken heads (optional)

2 tablespoons raw apple cider vinegar

3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped

2 carrots, coarsely chopped

1 onion, quartered

Handful of fresh parsley

Sea salt

 

Put the chicken or carcasses in a pot with 4 quarts of water; add the chicken feet and heads (if you're using them) and the vinegar. Let sit for 30 minutes, to give the vinegar time to leach the minerals out of the bones. Add the vegetables and turn on the heat. Bring to a boil and skim the scum. Reduce to barely a simmer, cover and cook for 6 to 24 hours. During the last 10 minutes of cooking, throw in a handful of fresh parsley for added flavor and minerals. Let the broth cool, strain it, and take any remaining meat off the bones to use in future cooking. Add sea salt to taste and drink the broth as it is or store it in the fridge (up to 5 to 7 days), or freezer (up to 6 months), for use in soups and stews.

 

Beef Broth

Makes about 4 quarts 

Beef broth has a more intense flavor than chicken, but it's delicious all the same. Be sure to include both marrow and knuckle bones to get the added nutritional benefit of bone marrow in your broth. Some people roast bones in the oven for 15 to 30 minutes before throwing them in the pot to improve the flavor of the stock, but Dr. Campbell-McBride advises using raw bones.

3- 4 pounds beef marrow and knuckle bones

2 pounds meaty bones, such as short ribs

1/2 cup raw apple cider vinegar

4 quarts filtered water

3 celery stalks, halved

3 carrots, halved

3 onions, quartered

Handful of fresh parsley

Sea salt

 

Place the bones in a pot, add the apple cider vinegar and water, and let the mixture sit for 1 hour so the vinegar can leach the minerals out of the bones. (Add more water if needed to cover the bones.) Add the vegetables, bring to a boil, and skim the scum from the top and discard. Reduce to a low simmer, cover, and cook for 24 to 72 hours. During the last 10 minutes of cooking, throw in a handful of fresh parsley for added flavor and minerals. Let the broth cool and strain it, making sure all the marrow is knocked out of the marrow bones and into the broth. Add sea salt to taste and drink the broth as is or store it in the fridge (up to 5 to 7 days) or freezer (up to 6 months) for use in soups and stews.